Bio

The short version

I started my programming journey using punch cards in a time before the internet.

When the first microprocessors came to market, I built my first computer using a 6502 processor, keyboard, a modified B&W TV for a monitor, 1K of RAM, and an audio cassette deck for backing store.

Early in my journey I developed communication drivers to interconnect point of sale and mainframe systems, implementing packages for async, bisync, X.25, tcpip, NetBui, SNA, and RPC/Sockets protocols.

When OS’s became commodities, my next path started by joining a development team which developed one of the first large scale object oriented (C++) frameworks.   The framework enabled a business application to run on multiple operating systems.   The framework abstracted the OS interfaces and allowed the applications to run on OS/2, Windows 3.1, Windows NT, and Unix.

At the peak of the Dotcom boom, I started a new path by joining a startup company to develop ecommerce sites. 

Working with web technologies and site performance and scalability was incredibly interesting and satisfying work.  Unfortunately the Dotcom bubble soon burst and the startup company burned through its venture capital and locked the doors.

My next adventure was joining a distributed development team which worked in four time zones, responsible for delivering a business framework, comprised of some of the best developers in the industry.

Today I work as a consultant, using my experience of many past projects to deliver quality solutions.

My passion is learning and staying current with the latest DotNet technologies– .NET 4.0, WCF, WPF, Silverlight, design patterns, and pattern libraries like Prism and Enterprise Library. 

I shake my head when I muse that just one core of the CPU in my dev box has 4000 times the computing power and the mobo holds 8000 times more RAM than my first homebrew system.

 

The long version

I started my programming journey using punch cards in a time before the internet. It was a time when one walked across the room to change channels on the TV or answer the phone.

When the first microprocessors came to market, I quickly dumped the punch cards and built my first computer. My homebrew system consisted of a 6502 processor, 1K of RAM, keyboard, modified B&W TV for a monitor, and an audio cassette deck for backing store. Hard drives were financially out of reach.

Early in my journey I developed communication drivers to interconnect point of sale and mainframe systems, implementing packages for async, bisync, X.25, tcpip, NetBui, SNA, and RPC/Sockets protocols. It was a time when the industry used in house proprietary operating systems.

Eventually, operating systems which supported features for real time processing and ran in small hardware foot prints (Not PDP-11, DEC-VAX, or IBM 370 behemoth boxes) became off the shelf items.

Windows, Unix, Windows NT, and OS/2 became standard and software modules for communication, video, printer, and keyboard drivers became part of the OS. Writing proprietary operating systems and IO drivers system became a niche area of work.

It was time to start a new journey.

I joined a team responsible for developing one of the first large scale object oriented (C++) frameworks. The framework abstracted OS interfaces and allowed an application to run on OS/2, Windows 3.1, Windows NT, and Unix.

My next path was development of server management software. I developed software which monitored the health of disk drives, communication links, running processes. The software performed warnings of pending failures and fail over recovery when possible.

At the peak of the dotcom boom, I joined a startup company to develop software to generate and manage ecommerce sites for small to medium size businesses. Working with web technologies and site performance and scalability was incredibly interesting and satisfying work.

Unfortunately the dotcom bubble soon burst. The startup company burned through its venture capital and locked the doors.

It was time to start a new journey.

My next adventure was joining a distributed development team which worked in four time zones, responsible for delivering a business framework.

Working with some of the best developers in the industry was an awesome learning and growing opportunity. The environment was challenging and fast paced. A great environment! But all good things come to an end. The company consolidated operations and moved from four time zones to one.

Today I work as a consultant, using my software experience of many past projects to deliver quality solutions.

My passion is learning and staying current with the latest DotNet technologies– .NET 4.0, WCF, WPF, Silverlight, design patterns, and pattern libraries like Prism and Enterprise Library.

I love how the new language additions of LINQ, Lambda expressions and anonymous methods increase programming productivity. The new tools for architecture and database management in Visual Studio are beyond I imagined when using Brief, MASM, and SYSDEBUG. Visual Studio 2010 architecture tools ROCK. Unlike, back in the day, the Rational Rose UML modeling tools. They always sucked.

I’m in awe at the ease of interconnecting systems using WCF and WCF RIA services compared to the early days of computing.

I shake my head when I muse how just one core of the CPU in my dev box has 4000 times the computing power and the mobo holds 8000 times more RAM than my first homebrew system. Oh, and now hard drives are affordable and I don’t have to walk across the room to change channels or answer the phone.

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